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: Feb 18, 13
ARCO 2013 Review:  Does “CO” Stand For Contemporary or Commercial ?
This weekend we visited ARCO, Madrid’s annual International Contemporary Art, and here I bring you my fresh impressions.
Arco is an event of long history (now into its 32nd year) and impressive statistics: this year 2000 artists were presented by 201 galleries from 27 countries, and its history and grand scale set very high expectations. During the 4 days, two huge pavilions were adopted into a meta-museum, a labyrinth of solemn white walls packed with thousands of colorful works of art.
However, while these large numbers testify to grand ambition of event organizers, they don’t do justice to artists and visitors, as exhibited pieces lack the proper space and time to be properly enjoyed. There is no doubt that seeing this large body of work would bring us more joy and inspiration if we have seen it over the course of entire year, one gallery at a time, instead packing everything into one full-day visit. Art takes time to create, but also takes time and space to consume. Events like Arco, in order to maximize profits, unfortunately tend to compress this experience until the point where all pieces of art blur into one indistiguishable mass of colors and shapes.
What greatly adds to this perception problem is that fact that, unlike museums, it was not possible to properly curate the exhibition as a whole and group together work according to common themes, media, or any other criteria, as the layout of the floor plan was dictated merely by the purchasing power of participating galleries.
But much greater disappointment comes from tragic lack of diversity and innovation. Contraversial subjects, new technologies, video art, performance, installation art - these are all almost completely absent from this year’s Arco, creating an absurd situation that the most vital part of today’s art production is not represented by the exhibition that claims to be about “contemporary art”. In fact, all that this year’s visitors could see were paintings, prints and wall-mounted plastic pieces that wouldn’t look out of place or new even if they were exhibited 50 years ago, and there is an obvious reason for that: the intention of Arco is no longer to offer a glimpse into contemporary art scene, but to cater to very specific taste of its target market: rich clients belonging to reactionary establishment. And what this target market wants are nice decorative pieces that can be purchased by dozens and hung in corporate hallways and conference rooms.
Somewhere along these 32 years, Arco seems to have lost “Contemporary” from its name, and instead of “Arte Contemporaneo” has become all about “Arte Commercial”. Luckily for the real lovers of art, this doesn’t mean that people stopped innovating and moving the art forward into new millenium: it simply means that Arco as an event has become completely irrelevant. We no longer need big fairs and expensive tickets, when great art is literary just one mouse-click away or better yet, the best of art is often hidden in the cracks of the facades just around the corner.



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ARCO 2013 Review:  Does “CO” Stand For Contemporary or Commercial ?

This weekend we visited ARCO, Madrid’s annual International Contemporary Art, and here I bring you my fresh impressions.

Arco is an event of long history (now into its 32nd year) and impressive statistics: this year 2000 artists were presented by 201 galleries from 27 countries, and its history and grand scale set very high expectations. During the 4 days, two huge pavilions were adopted into a meta-museum, a labyrinth of solemn white walls packed with thousands of colorful works of art.

However, while these large numbers testify to grand ambition of event organizers, they don’t do justice to artists and visitors, as exhibited pieces lack the proper space and time to be properly enjoyed. There is no doubt that seeing this large body of work would bring us more joy and inspiration if we have seen it over the course of entire year, one gallery at a time, instead packing everything into one full-day visit. Art takes time to create, but also takes time and space to consume. Events like Arco, in order to maximize profits, unfortunately tend to compress this experience until the point where all pieces of art blur into one indistiguishable mass of colors and shapes.

What greatly adds to this perception problem is that fact that, unlike museums, it was not possible to properly curate the exhibition as a whole and group together work according to common themes, media, or any other criteria, as the layout of the floor plan was dictated merely by the purchasing power of participating galleries.

But much greater disappointment comes from tragic lack of diversity and innovation. Contraversial subjects, new technologies, video art, performance, installation art - these are all almost completely absent from this year’s Arco, creating an absurd situation that the most vital part of today’s art production is not represented by the exhibition that claims to be about “contemporary art”. In fact, all that this year’s visitors could see were paintings, prints and wall-mounted plastic pieces that wouldn’t look out of place or new even if they were exhibited 50 years ago, and there is an obvious reason for that: the intention of Arco is no longer to offer a glimpse into contemporary art scene, but to cater to very specific taste of its target market: rich clients belonging to reactionary establishment. And what this target market wants are nice decorative pieces that can be purchased by dozens and hung in corporate hallways and conference rooms.

Somewhere along these 32 years, Arco seems to have lost “Contemporary” from its name, and instead of “Arte Contemporaneo” has become all about “Arte Commercial”. Luckily for the real lovers of art, this doesn’t mean that people stopped innovating and moving the art forward into new millenium: it simply means that Arco as an event has become completely irrelevant. We no longer need big fairs and expensive tickets, when great art is literary just one mouse-click away or better yet, the best of art is often hidden in the cracks of the facades just around the corner.

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What Would US Government Do If They REALLY Wanted To Stop Teen Shootings?

Thoughts : Jan 12, 13

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On December 14, 2012, an outcast teenager walked in an elementary school and shot to death 20 children and 6 member of staff, before commiting suicide. In response to that, this week US vice-president Joe Biden formed a task force on gun violence, inviting to dialog National Riffle Association, as well as representatives from video game and film industries. Once again the games and films will have to take blame for violent acts, but let’s just stop for a moment and think about facts.

Kids around the world all watch the same violent films and play the same violent games. Yet only in USA they end up shooting up each other in schools. This fact alone obviously says there is NO CORRELATION between the games, films and real-life violence. If it was, we would be hearing about teen shooting in Spain, France, Poland and any other country as often as teen shoting in USA.
This argument is so simple and so powerful that it makes one wonder why a US vice-president would be blind to again turn his rethorics against the usual suspect, games and films?

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I Am An Information Addict

: Jan 6, 13

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Hello, everyone. My name is Nenad and I am an information addict. I am compulsive e-book reader, web video watcher and podcast listener, routinely doing all these things at the same time.And with an unusually lot of free time over the holidays, things started to spiral out of control.

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Design on Film, #1:
"Playtime", by Jacques Tati (1967)

Almost half a century after its release, Playtime still stands out as a unique master piece. It turned the conventional film making upside down, from the clever script that pinpoints background noise instead of a dialog, to multiple story lines that are beautifully choreographed to all take place at the same time on screen, to gloriously shot breathtaking set design that becomes the central character of the plot. This integrated work of art was a spectacular financial failure that ruined director and its production company at the time of release, but in the longer run it became the focal point of the legacy of Jacques Tati that forever made his place among the very greatest directors in the history of cinema.
It is also the best possible introduction to a series of posts where I will share my inspiration at the intersection of the two of my favorite disciplines, design and cinema.
Enjoy these beautiful shots, or even better get a DVD and see the movie, unless you suffer from attention deficit disorder!

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Piggy Jr, The Interactive Trashcan :)

I just received my Makey Makey, and hooked it up to a trashcan for a little interactive test: Piggy Jr, The Interactive Trashcan. Coded in Moai SDK.

moai sdk : Oct 16, 12
3D Max To MOAI SDK Exporter, Test 1
Here’s the first test of the exporter that I am working on, which can open 3D models in a Moai SDK application. The exported model appears to be mirrored, but otherwise works pretty well.

3D Max To MOAI SDK Exporter, Test 1

Here’s the first test of the exporter that I am working on, which can open 3D models in a Moai SDK application. The exported model appears to be mirrored, but otherwise works pretty well.

moai sdk open source : Oct 14, 12

SVG Importer to Moai SDK Teaser Screenshots

I am working on a feature-rich free SVG importer for Moai SDK. A couple of screenshots, and hopefully source code coming very soon, with bunch of samples and tutorials!

inspiration : Jun 27, 12

Matt Pyke D&AD Lecture

Super-inspiring talk by Matt Pyke of Universal Everything on creative process behind his amazing and diverse body of work.
MoaiSDK Example: Simple API for Drawing Polygons
A little something for aspiring game developers: I made a simple lua module for MoaiSDK that can draw rectangles, circles and filled polygons as meshes, and apply solid color or gradient to them. It’s just a work in progress but someone might find it handy so you can download it here.
If you wonder what MoaiSDK is in the first place, it’s a very cool platform for creative programming. Plus it’s open source, plus it’s cross platform. If you’re into coding, you should check it out at: www.getmoai.com
I plan on doing a serie of MoaiSDK tutorials here,  so keep up with my twitter if you’re a nerdy type :)

MoaiSDK Example: Simple API for Drawing Polygons

A little something for aspiring game developers: I made a simple lua module for MoaiSDK that can draw rectangles, circles and filled polygons as meshes, and apply solid color or gradient to them. It’s just a work in progress but someone might find it handy so you can download it here.

If you wonder what MoaiSDK is in the first place, it’s a very cool platform for creative programming. Plus it’s open source, plus it’s cross platform. If you’re into coding, you should check it out at: www.getmoai.com

I plan on doing a serie of MoaiSDK tutorials here,  so keep up with my twitter if you’re a nerdy type :)

architecture inspiration : May 23, 12

Pure Architectural Porn

12 minute animation of Piranesi’s Carceri series made by Gregoire Dupond at Factum Arte specifically for the exhibition Le Arti di Piranesi: architetto, incisore, antiquario, vedutista, designer (The Art of Piranesi: architect, engraver, antiquarian, vedutista, designer)

Watching Gregoire Dupond’s animation is literally like entering Piranesi’s mind.